Saturday, March 4, 2017

Lunches


Tuesday: l/o tuna cake with tartar sauce, on a bun; serving of l/o green beans

Wed (no photo) was 1/2 a can of RTS clam chowder, crackers


Thurs: l/o pizza

Fri(no photo) was egg and olive salad sandwich on homemade bread

DS continues to take a lunch daily to school. A refillable water bottle, a sandwich, either fruit or a raw veg of some sort, sometimes a baked good instead.  We are on a grocery buying freeze, actually all spending at the moment. I used up the remaining coldcuts, no more will be bought for some time. He had ham and Swiss, Salami and Provolone, PB and jam, Salami and Provolone round 2, PB and Jam round 2. Sliced cheeses are dwindling, I will soon move back to hand planing cheese off of blocks of cheese already bought. I see the following for his school lunches within the next 12 weeks until the end of his term, as I absorb the costs of buying and remodeling a home:
Sandwiches
-tuna salad
-baked BSCB sliced, or diced for a chicken salad
-egg and olive salad
-cheese with mustard (we observe Lenten meals on fridays)
-Pb/almond butter & homemade jam (finished the last bought grape, only Homemade remains)
-deviled ham salad (have a few bags of l/o ham in freezer)

Salads with protein
-qunioa salad
-pasta and bean salad

We're eating what little fresh fruit is on hand (lemons for cooking/tea, grapefruit for bfst) including apples and ripe pears that I need to do something with before they turn on me. I have dried(baking, salads, oatmeal) and fzn as well (think smoothies)

Fresh produce is limited, as usual this time of year. I have a nice supply of fzn and canned that I want gone in the next 12 weeks so as not to have to move it, and to save $. I have $300/month for groceries as well as $100 for restaurant (take out) so $400 x 3=$1200. I plan on buying 2 sinks and vanities, one pedestal sink, one toilet and a cast iron tub. While some of the $1200 will certainly be used for perishables, must haves, even if I nip this at only $100/mo, leaving $800-I suspect that this would cover the vanities and sinks at least.  Meanwhile, we will continue to eat well, and I will draw on my resources to use up what we have. I like the challenge.

5 comments:

Busy Bee said...

Growing up, I lived in a rural area. We always had lots of home canned fruit and frozen fruit during the winter. The same went with vegetables. (We had winter greens and things at least part of the winter.). We ate some fresh things, but most things weren't. Sometimes it is still kind of odd to me to see things like strawberries in the dead of winter.

It sounds like you have a great plan. You're absolutely right -- $800 will go nicely toward an improvement.

Christie Hogan said...

I love reading your updates! I have always been pretty Frugal/thrifty (by nature) but lately you have inspired me to look at everything a bit closer, dig deeper and think outside of the box. My husband says he didn't think I could tighten the budget anymore--but I've shown him! Lol As I get closer to quitting my job at the end of this school year, I am trying to sock away every penny I can, and we don't even feel like we've sacrificed eating healthy or done without what we need and still have room for some Frugal fun.
Thank you for your updates--I think I have read every single post! ☺

CTMOM said...

Busy, while I grew up in a middle class suburb with farms on one side of town, my Dad, who grew up dirt poor in a tenament (sometimes with no supper) had several caveats for running our home: we grew what we could, kept a pantry and a freezer (my uncle was a butcher), we shopped the dented section (Dad was a bread delivery driver and often worked out deals with store managers to buy a lot bundle of damaged goods, saving them from the dumpster and saving us serious $$), he'd also always stock the garage, which acted like our cold cellar with 50 lb bags from the feed supply store of potatoes, carrots, apples, onions. We ate what we had until the garden started again. I have therefor always been a seasonal eater. Fresher, cheaper and I like to support local farms. March will be easy, as we eat supplies down. April a bit of a challenge, May could become interesting. I like the idea of using my saved grocery money towards remodeling supplies. This may alot me some extras that are not VITAL to our move in, but would be nice, such as repainting the laundry/half bath in a green (currently every room is an offwhite/beige, except the pink bath, which has an upper wall in white-which I will keep.

CTMOM said...

Christine, My advice is to live NOW like you have already quit. Learn to live on just one salary, stashing away your income as a reserve. Good luck!

Christie Hogan said...

That is exactly what we have been doing for over a year--more like 3 (just not as strict as this last year) Socking my paycheck away and living solely on my husbands income. We wanted to make sure we had everything accounted for as best we could and tweak as we went along. We are empty nesters now, so it doesn't take nearly as much for the 2 of us to live on as it did in the past. We are both excited for me to "come home".
Christie