Sunday, February 5, 2017

Different measures

 One of the nonconsumer blogs I follow suggested using this technique for draining fried foods. Normally I would grab a saved paper bag, folded onto a plate, as I choose not to purchase paper towels. I had fried off this pork sausage for Sunday breakfast, using a spoon to gather all of the fat,
adding it to my bacon/pork/ham fat jar, for use in future cooking. Quite a bit of fat was saved, which is normal with sausage. The sausage in the first picture came out of the pan pretty grease free, so I saved a paper bag in the process. Next, I need to try this with bacon, which I know will lead to more grease dripping down onto the cookie sheet pictured above.

7 comments:

Busy Bee said...

That's an excellent idea. Thanks for sharing!

Anne in the kitchen said...

What a clever idea! Thank sou so much for posting it!

mikemax said...

Carol, you know I don't use paper towels, but I wouldn't dirty up a rack and cookie sheet with grease that I then had to wash (using water and detergent). Considering all of the water and chemicals used in papermaking, I would probably do as well ecologically to just use the paper towel.

What I often do it take half a sheet of newspaper and cover it with a paper napkin, which uses much less pulp and may even have been brought into the house with other food. I drain the meat on this. Once in awhile, if I have a big overabundance of T-shirt rags, I might drain the meat on the rag and then decide whether to wash the rag or discard it. Even if I pitch it, I get the feeling that I got one more use out of the T-shirt. If it's not too greasy, I just dump it in the laundry, and I don't care if the grease stains come out.

This brings up another point: disposable diapers. I used cloth diapers when it wasn't terribly unusual, but most people had switched to disposables. (Have you noticed, they don't call 'em "disposable diapers" anymore, just "diapers," like there is no other kind?). I still think cloth diapers are cheaper to use, and NOT THAT HARD, but when you consider the detergent, water and sometimes bleach, they are probably not that much more ecologically correct than the papermaking process. Whether going in the landfill or being treated as sewage--which is worse??

Belinda said...

I like this idea. I've also done the paper bag and put one paper towel on top of it. We could do the same thing with newspapers. I can get as many as I want from school as the leftover papers there are tossed in the dumpster.

HappyGrama said...

I used cloth diapers from 1977 till 1988 (not continually!) and believe it was much cheaper and more enviro-friendly...and always felt that I'd rather use that money to feed my family.

CTMOM said...

My Daughter was born in '92 with a hip dislocation issue (even though she was a C/section). Besides a weird brace, the orthopedist had me using cloth diapers as a means to holding her hips in a certain position vs using disposibles. Cloth diapers also were great as burping and nursing pads, to line under a baby's head in a crib (easier to remove and clean just that should a baby spit up vs changing the entire crib). Fast forward and the diapers were also used on my 3 sons. We saved serious cash as a result, sticking to disposibles for at night, when away from the home. This worked well for me.

mikemax said...

Carol, I figured that what I saved by using cloth diapers allowed me to pay adoption costs two years later for our son. I don't know where I would have gotten the ca$h otherwise. Now if that wasn't a worthwhile saving, I don't know what was! (I used cloth diapers from 1976-1981-ish)