Monday, December 26, 2016

A cleaning question


I am trying to clean the black, cast iron stove top grates to the range in my rental. One of the perks of rental living is inheriting the dirt and grime of former tenants who are not as fastidious as I like to be.  I am constantly cleaning the grates and underside (enameled) part of the gas range. The grates, however, especially the ones over the front 2 burners, have a lot of baked on, black gunk that I am trying to remove.

I first placed them in a garbage bag, soaked them in amonia for several hours. Helped but not as completely clean as I'd like. I then tried some of my homemade cleaner (a vinegar and dish soap formulation) that helped some more as well as literally scrapping black, burnt on gunk. I also used an old toothbrush to get into nooks and cranies. While there is a definate improvement, some gunk remains.

 What do you recommend to finally get the rest of this off?

9 comments:

Kat said...

I use the ammonia as well, but let it sit 24 hrs or so. A metal scrubby pretty much finishes off the job.

meme said...

I so understand this! When we bought this house seven years ago - it came with a black and stainless gas stove. The stove top only has two grates - both very big - one on the right side, one on the left side. I inherited dirty grates too - I feel like I am still trying to get the last of gunk off these - I clean them all the time - when we first moved in - I soaked them vinegar, dish soap, used magic erasers - each cleaning removed a little more, a little more but they are still not perfect - as I would like them to be. I also have one front burner that seems permanently dirty - it looked like - from years of use that the shiny finish is gone from immediate area - leaving a dirty looking, dingy "circle". I have washed and sprayed everything on this too. I like my appliances to look immaculate and this dingy area on my stove is the first thing I see.

Lucy M said...

Since you've tried ammonia and vinegar already, I'd try Dollar Tree oven cleaner (put in a bag and spray, let sit) or if there's any rusty looking stuff on it, I'd try Evapo-rust, it can be picked up at Tractor Supply. Those are my first choices for cast iron pans. I've also used an electrolysis tank with great success but I don't know how good the "cast iron" quality is for the stoves compared to cast iron pans.

Anne in the kitchen said...

I bought my stove new so the gunk is my fault. I was cooking and had a very messy spill over that "cooked" on the grate before I realized it had happened. A friend told me to take the grate and throw it on my gas grill outside and blast it for about minutes. I did, then let it cool to the touch and ran my grill cleaner over it. (wooden notched gizmo) The gunk has turned into a fine powder and scraped away easily.

Ms. Sandie said...

I was going to suggest putting the. In the oven on high heat, which echoes what Anne in the Kitchen suggests

carol pavlik said...

Something with grit, bon Ami?

Larissa Stretton said...

On a Facebook group I belong to, someone else had this problem and used baking soda with hydrogen peroxide. The picture they showed was amazing. Maybe that would do the trick.

upnitestx said...

Try the LA AWESOME cleaner you rave about. Thanks to you I have tried it on everything from grease and some set-in stains in laundry and some burnt (and I do mean burnt) residue in a pan with great success. I still had to scrub the burnt stuff but I had tried everything else I could think of without success. I use it for sticky stains and all kind of greasy surfaces with great success and no surface damage. Okay so now I am raving about it.

CTMOM said...

Yes, that was going to be my next attempt, tks.