Saturday, October 22, 2016

Maintain what you've got

 Here are DS # 2's new leather boots. Already scuffed about 1 week into ownership. He has an on campus job, the reason for my encouraging him to buy them, and they need to be maintained, including weather proofed.
 I asked him to bring me the shoe polish basket. I have what used to be called Cavalier shoe creme, now it's "leather balm" which is a great leather cleaner, especially in Winter due to road salts. I have an assortment of shoe polish: tan, maroon, black, brown and blue.

I grabbed a soft, terry cloth towel rag as a work station and the mink oil and shoe buffing brush. I applied a nice coat of the mink oil, the boots are now "drying" and will later be buffed. I grew up with the habit of polishing shoes every weekend for the upcoming week. Same principal as laundering on the weekend, changing bed linens, batch cooking including a big meat meal on Sunday to allow planned overs and typically a sandwich filling if not soup stock for the upcoming week.

5 comments:

Linda said...

Two days ago, I noticed my very old winter shoes are scuffed. I had just bought shoe polish and thought about my childhood shoe care habits. So, my shoe post was not just following your thoughts. Often I compose in my head. You said shoe balm. What about shoe polish?

Belinda said...

And Ladies would bake a cake on Saturday for after church on Sunday and however long it lasted the week. :)

CTMOM said...

Linda, shoe balm aka "Cavalier" in my mind, as that is what brand we always had, is a leather cleaning cream, that does leave a shine, conditions the leather. I also have shoe polish which refreshes scuffed marks that lost some color. I also use Mink oil with silicone for weather proofing.

Anne in the kitchen said...

I grew up in a house where shoe polishing was a weekly ritual also. In addition to polish we brushed suede and conditioned leather handbags with saddle soap. Its funny after reading this I swear I was smelling shoe polish.

CTMOM said...

Anne-I grew up with "school shoes" and play shoes, often last year's shoes or old sneakers, assuming that they still fit. We HAD to take care of the good shoes, funds were tight, but my parents insisted on leather shoes, in their minds, to not wear leather shoes was a sign that you were an immigrant; we're not far from the immigrant experience.